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Fannie Mae Executes First Credit Insurance Risk Transfer of 2022

Government-sponsored enterprise (GSE) Fannie Mae has executed its first Credit Insurance Risk Transfer (CIRT) transaction of 2022. CIRT 2022-1 covers $26.1 billion in unpaid principal balance (UPB) of generally 30-year original term, fixed-rate loans, acquired between January 2021 and March 2021.

As part of the GSE's continued effort to reduce taxpayer risk by increasing the role of private capital in the mortgage market, CIRT 2022-1 transferred $770.7 million of mortgage credit risk to private insurers and reinsurers. Since inception to date, Fannie Mae has acquired approximately $15.8 billion of insurance coverage on $563 billion of single-family loans through the CIRT program, measured at the time of issuance for both post-acquisition (bulk) and front-end transactions.

"CIRT 2022-1 begins a new, active year of CIRT issuance for Fannie Mae. We appreciate our continued partnership with the 22 insurers and reinsurers that wrote coverage for this deal," said Rob Schaefer, Fannie Mae’s VP of Capital Markets.

The loan pool for CIRT 2022-1 consists of approximately 87,600 single-family mortgage loans with an outstanding unpaid principal balance of approximately $26.1 billion. The covered pool includes collateral with loan-to-value (LTV) ratios ranging from 60.01% to 80.00%. The loans included in this transaction are fixed-rate, generally 30-year term, fully amortizing mortgages, and were underwritten using rigorous credit standards and enhanced risk controls.

With CIRT 2022-1, which became effective January 1, 2022, Fannie Mae will retain risk for the first 25 basis points of loss on the $26.1 million covered loan pool. If the $65.3 million retention layer is exhausted, 22 insurers and reinsurers will cover the next 295 basis points of loss on the pool, up to a maximum coverage of approximately $770.7 million.

As of December 31, 2021, $750 billion in outstanding UPB of loans in our single-family conventional guaranty book of business were included in a reference pool for a credit risk transfer transaction.

About Author: Eric C. Peck

Eric C. Peck has 20-plus years’ experience covering the mortgage industry, he most recently served as Editor-in-Chief for The Mortgage Press and National Mortgage Professional Magazine. Peck graduated from the New York Institute of Technology where he received his B.A. in Communication Arts/Media. After graduating, he began his professional career with Videography Magazine before landing in the mortgage space. Peck has edited three published books and has served as Copy Editor for Entrepreneur.com.
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