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Florida Foreclosure Backlog Diminishing Slower Than Hoped

Last year the Florida State Courts Administration asked its legislators for $9.6 million to try to clear its massive backlog of foreclosures.

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Since the courts received the money and began working through the backlog in July 2010, the state has cleared more than 110,000 foreclosures from its system.

That, however, leaves more than 350,000 foreclosures left to work through.

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In Florida, a foreclosure must have a judge's signature of approval before it can proceed, making working through the mountain of foreclosures even more difficult and time consuming.

Part of the nearly $10 million the courts received went to hiring more judges and managers to handle the cases.

According to the ""Bradenton Herald"":http://www.bradenton.com/ Web site, the state's 20 judicial districts set a goal to reduce their backlogs by 62 percent by July 2011. But currently the statewide average of cleared cases sits at 24 percent.

The site, which covers the 12th circuit of Florida, reported part of the problems courts are facing clearing the backlog have come from foreclosure moratoriums and robo-signing issues.

The 12th circuit received more than $200,000 of the money, and thus far has cleared more than 4,500 cases from their system.

According to the ""Palm Beach Post"":http://www.palmbeachpost.com/blogs/, Palm Beach County has reduced its foreclosure backlog to 32,284, from an estimated 55,000 in early 2010.

About Author: Joy Leopold

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