Google+
  • Ocwen21.48-4.78 -18.20%
  • Zillow109.01+1.21 +1.12%
  • Trulia46.12+0.76 +1.68%
  • NationStar34.710.00 0.00%
  • CoreLogic28.24+0.51 +1.84%
  • RE/MAX31.44-0.05 -0.16%
  • Fannie Mae2.40+0.13 +5.73%
  • Freddie Mac2.26+0.16 +7.62%
  • Wells Fargo50.45+1.27 +2.58%
  • CitiMortgage51.27+0.74 +1.46%
  • Bank of America16.60+0.34 +2.09%
  • Fidelity National Financial28.75+0.45 +1.59%
  • First American28.75+0.44 +1.55%
  • AUDUSD=X0.8796N/A N/A
  • USDJPY=X106.845N/A N/A
  • WP Stock Ticker
Home | Daily Dose | Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac Post Q2 Earnings
Print This Post Print This Post

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac Post Q2 Earnings

Fannie-Freddie-logos-two

The U.S. government is set to see another $5.6 billion from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac as both GSEs continue to post solid earnings.

Both companies released on Thursday their earnings reports for the second quarter, reporting subdued profits compared to recent quarters as settlement earnings and other previous one-time benefits subside. In 2011, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, acting as conservator for Fannie and Freddie, brought lawsuits against 18 banks for their alleged roles in bringing down the GSEs' portfolios with bad loans. The majority of those cases are now settled, leaving little for the companies to collect going forward.

Those cuts in one-time earnings were offset in part by rising home prices and improvements in credit quality.

For its part, Fannie Mae took in $3.7 billion in profits through the quarter, all of which will be handed to the Treasury per the terms of the GSEs' bailout in 2008. Freddie Mac, which reported $1.4 billion in net income, will return $1.9 billion to the government.

By September, the two mortgage giants will have paid a combined $218.7 billion back to the Treasury, more than $30 billion more than the amount they've drawn since their bailout. Under their amended agreement, dividend payments will continue to go on as the government maintains its controlling stake in the companies.

How long that situation will continue is still undecided as policymakers—from Congress to the White House—push to reform the secondary market and bring in more private capital. While recent housing finance reform bills have made some headway in committee, debates over how to proceed have stalled any further progress, and no major moves are expected this year.

Meanwhile, shareholders for the GSEs, spurred by their recent profitability, continue to pressure the companies and the government for their cut.

Bookmark and Share

About Author: Tory Barringer

Tory Barringer
Tory Barringer began his journalism career in early 2011, working as a writer for the University of Texas at Arlington's student newspaper before joining the DS News team in 2012. In addition to contributing to DSNews.com, he is also the online editor for DS News' sister publication, MReport, which focuses on mortgage banking news.

Leave a Reply

Scroll To Top